Cholesterol
Health

Cholesterol Health

Understanding Triglycerides

A triglyceride is a type of fat (lipid) found in the blood and in many body tissues. The other major type of fat is cholesterol.

It is important to know that not all cholesterol is the same. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) is considered “good,” because it helps to clear away fats from the bloodstream. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is “bad,” because high levels increase the risk for heart disease.1 High levels of triglycerides have also been shown to increase the risk of heart disease.1


There are many factors that can lead to high triglyceride levels,1 including:


Adult Treatment Panel (ATP) III Classification (mg/dL)1

Triglycerides
<150 Normal
150-199 Borderline high
200-499 High
≥500 Very high
HDL Cholesterol
<40 Low
≥60 High
LDL Cholesterol
<100 Optimal
100-129 Near optimal/above optimal
130-159 Borderline high
160-189 High
≥190 Very high
Total Cholesterol
<200 Desirable
200-239 Borderline high
≥240 High
Reference
  1. National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP). Third Report of the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluations, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults. Adult Treatment Panel III— Final Report. NIH Publication No. 02-5215. September 2002.

MY CHOLESTEROL HEALTH CONNECT

MY CHOLESTEROL HEALTH CONNECT

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